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Commensalism

Commensalism


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theanomalisticsavant:

No care in the world

(Source: vitamina-calcium)

femmadilemma:

just watch it

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fuckindiva:

George Harrison self-portrait in India, 1966

fuckindiva:

George Harrison self-portrait in India, 1966


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djferreira224:

The wood frog has garnered attention by biologists over the last century because of its freeze tolerance

djferreira224:

The wood frog has garnered attention by biologists over the last century because of its freeze tolerance


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oxane:

Water Texture by ►CubaGallery
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(Source: life)


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marzlovejoy:

Ladies…

marzlovejoy:

Ladies…


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staceythinx:

The Ease of Propagation by Mathias Vef

Vef on his project:

The Ease of Propagation is a series of collages that explores the confusion in our relation to nature and technology. Nature is designed while technology evolves. Cultural meanings waft creation and creator, designer and design.

He can also be found on Facebook

"

It is impossible to predict accurately what will happen after taking a psychedelic drug on any particular day. Nevertheless, we will generalize about their subjective effects because we must gain a sense of “typical” response. We can do this by averaging all of our own and others’ experiences, all of the “trips” that have gone before us. (By “trip” I mean the full effects of a typical psychedelic drug like LSD, mescaline, psilocybin, or DMT. A trip is difficult to define, but we certainly know when we are having one!)
The following descriptions do not apply to “mild” psychedelics such as MDMA or usual-strength marijuana, nor do they describe responses to low doses of psychedelics, for which effects are similar to those of other non-psychedelic drugs, like amphetamine.
Psychedelics affect all of our mental functions: perception, emotion, thinking, body awareness, and our sense of self.
Perceptual or sensory effects often, but not always are primary. Objects in our field of vision appear brighter or duller, larger or smaller, and seem to be shifting shape and melting. Eyes closed or open, we see things that have little to do with the outside world: swirling, colorful, geometric cloud patterns, or well-formed images of both animate and inanimate objects, in various conditions of motion or activity.
Sounds are softer or louder, harsher or gentler. We hear new rhythms in the wind. Singing or mechanical sounds appear in a previously silent environment.
The skin is more or less sensitive to touch. Our ability to tase and smell becomes more or less acute.
Our emotions overflow or dry up. Anxiety or fear, pleasure or relaxation, all feelings wax and wane, overpoweringly intense or frustratingly absent. At the extremes lie terror or ecstasy. Two opposite feelings may exist together at the same time. Emotional conflicts become more painful, or a new emotional acceptance takes place. We have a new appreciation of how others feel, or no longer care about them at all.
Our thinking processes speed up or slow down Thoughts themselves become confused or clearer. We notice the absence of thoughts, or it is impossible to contain the flood of new ideas. Fresh insights about problems come, or we become hopelessly stuck in a mental rut. The significance of things takes on more importance than the things themselves. Time collapses: in the blink of an eye, two hours pass. Or time expands: a minute contains a never ending march of sensations and ideas.
Our bodies are hot or cold, heavy or light; our limbs grow or shrink; we move upward or downward through space. We feel the body no longer exists, or that the mind and body have separated.
We feel more or less in control of our “selves.” We experience others influencing our minds or bodies - in ways that are beneficial or frightening. The future is ours for the taking, or fate has determined everything and there is no point in trying.
Psychedelics affect every aspect of our consciousness. It is this unique consciousness that separates our species from all others below, and that gives us access to what we consider the divine above. Maybe that’s another reason why the psychedelics are so frightening and so inspiring: They bend and stretch the basic pillars, the structure and defining characteristics, of our human identity.

These are the psychedelic drugs there exists a complex and rich contexts for viewing them, a perspective that few appreciate. They are not new substance, and we know an enormous amount about them. They ushered in the modern era of biological psychiatry, and their highly publicized abuse prematurely ended an extraordinarily rich human research endeavor.

"

~ DMT: The Spirit Molecule - Rick Strassman, M.D. (via comemierdaaa)

(via comemierdaaa)

scientificdivinity:

The universe is always trying to give you exactly what you want. However you cannot receive it until you are ready to accept it. You will only experience what your level of consciousness allows you to perceive. So to accept what you truly want, no matter what it is, become more conscious, and the universe will automatically respond. The universe is an intelligent being, and it loves you unconditionally. It is only you, that puts a limitation on what you can experience.


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(Source: fissura)


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justenoughisplenty:

Following ancient lifeways, Tontonac Indians of Mexico’s state of Veracruz plant a hillside in maize. Behind them rise the stately ruins of El Tajín, a metropolis built by Maya-related Huastec people. It flourished between A.D. 300 and 1100.
National Geographic - August, 1980

justenoughisplenty:

Following ancient lifeways, Tontonac Indians of Mexico’s state of Veracruz plant a hillside in maize. Behind them rise the stately ruins of El Tajín, a metropolis built by Maya-related Huastec people. It flourished between A.D. 300 and 1100.

National Geographic - August, 1980


(via wavepatterns)